Around The World trick shot

Around The World

As you catch the ball you have to follow the balls path so they don't bounce on the racket

Andrea Fierro, head coach at Jonathan Markson Tennis’ Coach in Training programme in Brighton, shares his favourite trick

The Coach In Training programme, which is open to players aged 15 and over and held at Brighton University campus, includes a session which involves the trainee coaches learning new tricks. While it is lots of fun, it helps the trainees understand the learning process by turning them into a beginner again.

One of the skills the students attempt to master is the “Round The World” trickshot, which involves releasing multiple balls from the racket face and catching them again after moving the racket all the way around the balls in flight.

“To do the around the world trick first, you need to master the two main movements,” explains Fierro, who can perform the skill with six balls. “Firstly the toss, and secondly the racket movement around the ball.

“The most important thing about the toss is that it has to be high enough to have time to go around the ball, but not too much. You will start the racket movement around the ball as it is rising, so it can't be too high either. The more balls you use, the more of is important to toss the balls so that they stick together. As you can imagine, the more balls the more difficult it is to keep them all together.

“You have to hold the racket with two hands and you quickly have to move the racket over-in front and underneath the ball. As you catch the ball you have to follow the balls path so they don't bounce on the racket.”

Let’s Go Around The World

  1. Start the learning process with one ball. Hold the racket with two hands as in the photos, let the ball bounce and then catch it on the racket.
     
  2. Next step is learning the movement: toss the ball. As it bounces, place the racket away from your chest and have the ball bounce back up between your chest and the racket. Then place the racket underneath the ball and gently catch it.
     
  3. Once you have mastered the movement, try it without bouncing the ball.
     
  4. When you are confident with one ball, add another. Don’t let them bounce on the floor this time – go straight into the full action.
     

If you are interested in learning this trick or joining the Coach In Training programme in Brighton then find out more at marksontennis.com

 

Posted by: tennishead

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